John Adams1,2

M, #983, b. 18 June 1805, d. 10 September 1874
Last Edited=4 Dec 2014
The copy of signature from John King (the 1835 signature) and from John Adams (the 1867 signature) shows the similarities and perhaps helps verify that John King and John Adams were the same person. These images were given to this researcher by George Shirley, another Adams/King researcher, in May 2008.
     John Adams, son of Thomas King III and Maria Therese Woodland, was born on 18 June 1805 at Florida. Miss Gertrude McRae, who was interviewed regarding the history of the Adams home, states that John Adams was born near the line of Georgia and Florida near the Atlantic Seaboard, of Welch parentage.3,4,5,6 Though he was born "John King" he was known most of his life as "John Adams". After this researcher's own long searching for the parents of John Adams, the mystery may have been solved. In May 2008, George Shirley sent the following:

"For years I have searched for the father of John Adams, Clarke County, Mississippi pioneer. Listed below is what I and a Florida researcher, a descendent of Thomas King III, have concluded.

"In 1835, Thomas King III of Nassau County, FL crossed the state line into Camden County, GA with his sons John king, Hiram King, George King, son-in-law William Rouse and his brother Simeon Rouse proceeding to the Casey home. It is believed they were seeking revenge for his daughter Adeline King marrying William Casey against Thomas King's will and angry that the Caseys had supposedly untied his ferry boats at King's Ferry enabling them to float down the river towards the Atlantic Ocean. Several members of the Casey family were killed along with at least one other and several other people were wounded.

"Thomas King III was caught, tried, and executed. All others escaped and fled. For years, various researchers have tried to find the King sons who fled. Recently...I have concluded that John and Hiram King fled to Jasper County, Mississippi and changed their last name to Adams...".6,2 John Adams was the son of Thomas King III and Maria Therese Woodland.2

Here is the rationale regarding the identy of John Adams and John King being identical. It is quoted from a 3 May 2008 e-mail from researcher George Shirley:

"In my opinion, we are 99.99999999% sure that John Adams was really John King. I don't think you can get any more certain...the absolute proof and any review of the facts is overwhelming that John and Hiram King are John and Hiram Adams.

"First we must remember that there just were not that many people living in Clarke County, MS, Camden County, GA, and Nassau County, Fl back in 1835. The fact that John Adams in Clarke County, MS lists Adeline Casey and her husband William Casey and Mary Fox as his sisters living in Florida and the fact that Thomas King has 2 daughters named Adeline Casey who married William Casey and another daughter named Mary who married a Fox is enough proof indeed. Then add to the fact that John Adams list as his brothers Hiram, Josiah, Jackson, Perry, and Edward and Thomas King had sons named Hiram, Josiah, Jackson, Perry, and Edwin makes the odds in this not being the same family some unbelievable odds. Remember, our John Adams never knew his brother Edwin, so that accounts for the slight difference in that one name.
"Also when you compare the signature of John King and John Adams they are very similar especially considering they are about 30 years apart.
"Remember that John and Hiram Adams came to Mississippi about 1835 - Thomas King was executed in May, 1835 - so his older sons fled in 1835 - another coincidence?
"Also, Hiram Adams who died in Jasper County, MS named his son ELIAS THOMAS ADAMS.
"ELIAS was the name of his wif'es father and THOMAS was the name of Hiram's father - THOMAS KING.
"Also, when you research Nassau County, Florida - where we know our John King, alias Adams came from - you will not find a HIRAM, JOSIAH, PERRY, AND JACKSON ADAMS - you only find these as KINGS.
"I would say that the overwhelming piece of "proof" is that John Adams lists Adeline, wife of William Casey and Mary Fox as his sisters, and we know they were daughters of THOMAS KING."2 John Adams was a a part of and incident recorded in newspapers and Court records at the time. For the specifics, refer to the narrative about Thomas King, III, ID number 1843, and father or father-in-law to most of the others involved; In February of 1835, there was an incident which apparently ended with the execution of Thomas King III, and the fleeing of his sons, John, Hiram and George. It is believed that sons John and Hiram eventually ended up in Mississippi and assumed the surname Adams. Two Rouse brothers also fled and they changed their surname to Hodge, which was their mother's maiden name.

In the Georgia Black Book the incident is reported this way:

"on the night of the 18th or 20th instant, THOMAS KING, HIRAM KING, GEORGE KING and JOHN KING, with two others names ROUSE 'entered into the house of MRS. JANE CASEY in the county of Camden in the State and in a most atrocious and savage manner, murdered her daughter NANCY CASEY (the mother of an infant child) and a young man named JAMES SCOTT, and also mortally wounded several other persons, members of her family.' THOMAS KING and his sons, HIRAM AND GEORGE, have fled justice."

The Camden County, Georgia, transcribed court records state that: April 8, 1835: Indictments for Murder were returned at this term against Thomas King 'commonly called Thomas King the Third', John King, Hiram King, George King, Simeon Rouse and William Rouse; Saml. F. Ryan, prosecutor. Thomas King, the third, was tried first, and found guilty. Witnesses for the State: Jane Casey, Garret Demott, Dr. Henry D. Holland; for the defendant, Adeline Casey and William McCulley. JOHN King was then placed on trial charged with murder in the second degree; found not guilty. On April 11, 1835, William Rouse and Simeon were placed on trial, and a mistrial was declared. On same date, Thomas King was sentenced to be hung May 8, 1835, and other defendants were ordered to be kept in Chatham County jail until next term. Note: Examination of minutes for the following two terms show that it was impossible to empanel a qualified jury in these cases, and so far as can be found the cases were never tried."

Researcher Frank J. Peugh relates the following regarding this incident: This story was "told by the oldest daughter (Mrs. Marion Rouse/Hodge Whatley) of William Rouse/Hodge to the mother (Mrs. Dee Alice Mosley Peugh) of" Frank J Peugh:
On the night of 18 February 1835, members of the Thomas King, III, group listened outside near the chimney of the Casey house. Parties in the Casey house were talking and laughing how 'Old Man King' would react the next morning when he discovered that his boats had been cut from their moorings and were floating down the river. This apparently angered Thomas king, III, because he operated a ferry service from Kings Ferry, Nassau County, FL between the South and North banks of Saint Mary's River. After learning of this act, Thomas King, III, led his group of six, including himself, on an emotional, insane and murderous charge into the Casey house seeking revenge. William Casey and his bride, Adeline King, had apparently anticipated her father's insane outrage and the bride and groom stayed elsewhere on the night of their wedding. Possibly, their anticipation or luck saved their lives.


On 25 Feb 1835, there was the following letter written to the then Governor of Georgia, Wilson Lumpkin, by a John H. McIntosh"
Dear Sir
On the day that I heard of the shocking and atrocious murders committed by Thos. King and His sons on the bodies of Nancy Casey and James Scott on the north side of St. Mary's River, I met with Mr. Small. Clarke one of the Justices of our Inferior Court, and we agreed that I should make out a rough copy of the statement of facts, which he would have...forwarded to your Excellency...I will again relate the facts of this horrid transaction as I have lately heard them as coming from one of the Rouse who with his brother and John King are now in our County Jail. There are two families, that of King and Casey who live on the St. Marys River -- Kings in the Territory of Florida on the south side, and Casey on the north in the State of Georgia. One of the Casey’s run off with a daughter of the Kings, and carrying her into the interior of the state several miles, married her. On the 18th inst. John King now in custody went with Rouse to Mrs. Casey, and made to the family some most horrid and violent threats -- He went away, returned soon after, threw open the door of the House, which had been shut after him, and cried out to those outside of it 'that all was now clear' -- Thomas King, the father, with hi other sons, George and Hiram, now rushed in with knives drawn -- The Father, Thomas, first met with Nancy Casey, a young woman with an infant in her arms -- Her he stabbed to the Heart -- she fell and was found the day after with her child yet at her breast -- He next stabbed and cut open the bowels of Mr. James Scott, who without resistance fell dead a few paces off -- Mrs. Casey, the mother of Nancy was the third victim of this demonology -- He stabbed and cut her, but not mortally -- Finally Garret Demot, who was endeavoring to intercede for this poor woman, received in his body the fatal knife in two places - While the Father was acting this bloody scene, his son George, discovered a youth sick and lying in bed, called Baldwin Casey -- He stabbed and cut his abdomen across, so as to sever some of his entrails -- Scott and Demott made no part of the family -- but had accidentally stopped in.

I have heard nothing of either Demott or Casey within two or three days -- but neither of them were at that time expected to live.

The Kings, say Thomas the elder, and his sons George and Hiram, then returned to Florida, and I fear are at large -- Parties from this side who saw the dead Bodies, went under the excitement to endeavour to apprehend these wretches but it is expected that they will not succeed.


A Jacksonville, Florida newspaper on Thursday, February 26, 1835, described the incident and reported further on the eventual capture of the Kings and Rouses. That article concluded with "It was a melancholy sight -- a father and his two sons accused of murder -- and that with the original design of taking the blood of a daughter and sister. The same Cause which leads to the Commission of the most aggravated crimes occasioned this monstrous deed: Intemperance."

Frank J. Peugh, in his manuscript, states that on 18 Feb 1835, at about 11 pm, Thomas King, three of his sons and two Rouse brothers, one of whom was Thomas's son-in-law, killed Nancy Casey, age 25, daughter of Mrs. Jane Casey; James Scott; and James Baldwin Casey (who actually died on 24 Feb. 1835.) Another man, Garret Demott was not expected to live but actually did survive.7,8,9,10,11,12

Reported in the Jacksonville Courier Thursday 26 1835 was this:
"John King, Simeon Rouse and William Rouse have been arrested by the praiseworthy exertions of Mr. James F. Ryon, Deputy sheriff of Camden County Georgia and are safely confined in irons in the Jessup Georgia Jail. The Father (Thomas King) and two sons crossed the St. Marys River, six or eight miles above here on Saturday Morning. Their ages are Fifty five, Twenty two and twenty four years...

Monday, 3 O'Clock PM. Since we wrote the above, a small boat with a rather uncommon lot of passengers approached the wharf, and on going to the spot, we had the satisfaction of seeing the father and two sons charged with the above murder safely guarded by High Sheriffs Phillips of Duval county Florida. It seems they had left their three horses at Dr. Aldrich's Plantation and passed the River in a Canoe. They had spent the intermediate time in the vicinity and came back to recross and bring over the horses. They were recognized by a young man in the Family of the Sheriff and immediately secured without resistance. They will be forwarded with a guard to Camden county Georgia and there await their Trial...

The weapons found upon the Father and Sons were a small brass pistol, loaded within a quarter of an inch of the end with powder and three or four balls; besides each being supplied with a good sized knife. It was a Melancholy sight - a Father and his two sons accused of Murder."13


In the Camden County, Georgia, Superior Court Records: "It being expressed by the Sheriff that the jail of the County is insufficient for the safe and secure custody of George King - Hiram King - John King - Simeon Rouse and William Rouse - at the present Term of the Court for Murder. It is on motion of the Solicitor General - ordered that he do remove the said Prisoners under safe and secure custody to the Jail of Chatham County - and do there deliver them into the custody for the Jail of said Chatham County.

Then later, "The following Criminal Codes were continued - the prisoners having made their escape from the Jail of the County.13

John King (alias Adams) sent the following letter to his mother, Maria Therese Woodland King:                                   Savannah Sept 25th 1835
Dear Mother
          I received your letter dated Sept 19th on the 25th Inst. with great pleasure of hearing from you and that you were all well. We are all well except George he has had the ague and fever but I think he is a geting better. He has mist the fever three days and appears to be tollerable well today so am in hopes that he will miss the fever altogether. I hope these few lines may find you all well and doing well I wrote to you on the 8th of this month I thought you would have received it before now I do not know what is the reason is? Mr. Henry and Mr. Hollock was to see us this week. Mr. Henry said he received a letter from uncle John Tompkins and says he did not mention any thing about letting us have any money, I have not seen Mr. Houston since the 30th of August I do not know whether he has written to him or not. I should like to have some very much to get some things We shall stand in need of but we will try to make out without them if we cannot get some money form Mr. Houston. I am very glad to hear we have some very good friends thanks be to God for it for we had some very serious enemies last court and thanks be to God we had some very good friends then too and I hope that God will forever bless them for their kindness to us that is my earnest prayer. I want to see and be with you all again but God only knows whether I ever shall or not. I have put my trust in Him and I hope he will deliver me and all the rest out of the hands of our enemies if not in this world he will take us to a better one where we will see no more trouble. Tell Mrs Cacey that I received her compliment and am thankful to her and Tamsey both for their kind feelings towards us and I hope we should all live til Court that she will do us all justice which I think she will, for if it had not been for her through Gods mercies last court I should not have been here now. Tell Josiah I want him not to neglect improving his learning & teaching his little Brothers and sisters to read and not to be a going about on the Sabbath days. And give my love to him and all the rest of the family and to Uncle Woodland & to all the neighbours & to all our friends, like wise all the rest send theirs also to you all. So nothing more but remains your ever affectionate son
John King.14

John Adams married Epsey Young, daughter of Green Young and Sarah (?), on 9 May 1839 at Clarke County, Mississippi.6

In November, 2002, Dell Mayfield gave to the compiler a hand written listing of the Adams family records. The manuscript was written and then hand bound with a cover. On the back of the cover is: "Minutes of the Sixth Session of the Bethlehem Baptist Association held with the Pleasant Hill Baptist Church, Clark County, Mississippi, on the 25th, 26th, and 27th of September A.D. 185_" The pages are very old and are falling apart. It is unknown who wrote this information. Most of it was written at the same time and in the same hand. A transcription follows:

John and Epsey Adams was married in May the 9 1839.

John Adams and Lydia Evans was married October the 24 1854.

John Adams was born June 18th 1805.

Mary Adams was born April 20 1840.

Sarah Ann Adams was born July 27 1841.

Hiram Haras Adams was born the 19 1843.

Rebecca Jane Adams was born February the 25 1845.

Eliza Adams was born March the 28 1847.

John Robert Adams was born March the 1 1849.

William Walas Adams was born February the 27 1851.

James Polk Adams was born September 29 1853.

Thomas Edward Adams was born April the 19 1856.

Susan Adams was born December 22 1857.

George Adams was born July 2 1860.

Epsey Adams died October the 2 1853.

Elias Thomas Adams died November the 5 1861.

Melindia Stevens died December the 26 A.D. 1861.

Adkins Stevens died June the 5 1862.

John Stevens and Mary Adams married December the 15 1859.

Christopher Rankins Stevens was born May the 1 1861.6

In 1840, John Adams appeared on the United States Census, at Enterprise, Clarke County, Mississippi, John Adams, age 30-40 is living with two girls, one under age 5 and another age 10-15. There is no adult woman listed in the household.15,16

On one day in 1842 the following transactions occured between John and Epsey Adams and her family:

Green Young and Wife, Sarah, to John Adams; Clark Co., April 30 1842.
$150 paid by John Adams for land in Clark Co., viz: SE1/4 of SE1/4 sec. 12, T2, R14E (40 82/100a).
(signed) Green Young, Sarah (X) Young. Recorded July 1, 1842 W. F. Green, clk.

John Adams & wife, Epsey, to Alexander Young; Clark Co., April 30, 1842.
$18420.00 paid by Alexander Young for land in Clark Co., viz: NW1/4 of NW1/4 sec. 12, T2, R14E.
(signed) John Adams, Epsy (X) Adams.
Recorded Oct. 4, 1842. W.F. Green, clerk.17,18

"Establishing a homestead in the area now called Elwood, John Adams built a home, using hewn logs. Originally a one-room cabin, the house was built probably in 1845. In time the house became the property of Miss Gertrude McRae, the niece who cared for Mr. Adams in his later years.

"Classified as a 'folk structure' by the National Register of Historic Sites, the cabin is now a large, rambling one-story house of seven rooms, including the kitchen and bathroom which were originally located apart from the main house. The kitchen was built on in 1893. The house itself reflets the times when danger stood on the doorstep. Apertures for peeping or shooting through were there to let residents keep an eye out for the enemy - whever he was.

In March, 2012, this researcher received an email from a Roderick Terry who is an Adams/King descendant. About the Adams house and Miss Gertrude McRae, he writes, "I grew up in Quitman MS and knew Miss Gertrude Mc Rae very well. My Dad Milton V Terry and I went to visit Miss Gertrude many times in her home. We even had a couple of reunions at her place. Miss Gertrude was a wonderful lady I never went to her house that she did not have something old to show me and something to give me most of the time it was a stick of hard candy that were 2 for a penny when I was young or maybe a cookie or sweet tea but it was always something. I well remember her showing me the apertures in the house and her telling me they were used for defense against Indians. I remember her old kitchen that was separate from the house an her showing me that and telling me how kitchens were not built in homes because of the heat. But as I remember it the house was a story and a half not single story. It had a loft. There was a small branch that ran down the hill in front of her house I used to catch crawfish there while the adults were visiting."

"The historical significance of the Adams-Taylor house is its continuous ownership by the family since 1845..."

The Adams-Taylor-McRae house is Building 80002207 on the National Register of Historic Sites. In 2006 when this researcher visited the Quitman area, the above mentioned home was blocked from public access. I was told that it was owned by an attorney by the name of Robby Jones, who practiced in Meridian, Mississippi. Apparently the home was in poor condition and perhaps had been further damaged by Hurricane Katrina.19,20

A Gertrude McRae, Quitman, Mississippi, is quoted in Records of Clark Co., Mississippi:

"The Adams Home has a bit of romance in its beginnings. John Adams, its builder, was born in 1805 near the Georgia and Florida line, on the Atlantic Seaboard. In 1835, John and a brother journeyed west to Paulding. He was a school teacher by profession and followed that occupation in both Jasper and Clarke counties. He was a faithful member of the Methodist church. The church at Paulding was served by a circuit rider, who also visited the Clarke County church on his rounds. On one of these trips John Adams accompanied him, and on the return journey the young man remarked that if he could win Epsie Young and buy a certain tract of land he had seen, he would be a happy man. The first journey was followed by others and he won the lady of his choice and purchased the coveted land.

On this land, in 1845, he built a home of hewn logs and brick. It is said he burned the brick and hewed most of the logs himself. The kitchen, at that time, stood thirty feet away from the house, and had a tamped clay and sand floor, almost as hard as cement. The kitchen fire-place contained pot hooks and a place to barbeque meats.

In this old home, John and Epsie Adams lived until their death and reared a large family of sons and daughters. Part of the interesting old home is still in use, also several of the original out-buildings.

The driveway from the road to the house was about one-fourth of a mile long and was bordered with native trees, many of them remain.

A daughter, Eliza Adams, married Reuben Taylor in 1870. After the death of her parents, she and her husband bought the homestead and lived there until their deaths. After this, it passed to their son, J.E. Taylor, who with his niece, Gertrude Taylor, still occupies it."

In another book about Clarke County, Mississippi, it says that Gertrude McRae - the person quoted above - was the neice of John Adams. It is some confusing, though, because it was also a niece - Gertrude Taylor - who lived with J.E. Taylor.17,21

John Adams appears on the 1848 Tax Roll of Clarke Co., Mississippi. He was taxed on one clock, value $10.00, for which he was assessed $.80. In 1852 he was taxed $.35 for apparently the same $10 clock. But in 1854 he is shown with a clock valued at $15 for which he was taxed $.62.22

In 1850, John Adams appeared on the United States Census, at Clarke County, Mississippi.23

John Adams and wife, Epsey, to Samuel Hollingsworth; Clark Co., May 17, 1851. $100.00 paid by Samuel Hollingsworth for land in Clarke Co., viz: SE1/4 of SE1/4 sec. 12, T2, R14E (40 82/100a.)
(signed) John Adams, Epsey (X) Adams. Recorded June 30, 1851. A.G. Horn, Clerk.17

John Adams married Lydia Evans, daughter of Josiah Evans Sr., on 24 October 1854 at Mississippi.3

On 30 Jan 1855, John Adams and his wife Lydia, sold a piece of land to a James Stephens for $1000. One wonders if perhaps this James Stephens was the father of John Stephens who married first Mary Adams, then Rebecca Jane Adams, both daughters of John and his first wife, Epsey.24

In 1860, John Adams appeared on the United States Census, at Quitman, Clarke County, Mississippi.25

John Adams married Eliza Hering on 2 June 1870.2

On 10 July 1870, John Adams appeared on the United States Census, at Enterprise, Clarke County, Mississippi.26

John Adams died on 10 September 1874 at Clarke County, Mississippi, at age 69. John Adams is not to be found on the 1880 census so at this time this researcher's conclusion is that he had probably passed away between 1870 and the 1880 census. Originally I had thought he was still living in 1882 because of a transaction recorded then, but another Adams researcher, George Shirley, pointed out that that transaction was John F. Adams, a different man entirely. That researcher also believes that John Adam's death was about 1874.27,2,28

"Clarke County was established in 1833, one of seventeen Mississippi counties organized that year out of the Choctaw lands that were ceded by the tribe three years earlier in the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. It was named in honor of Joshua G. Clarke...a prominent Mississippi jurist...' Prior to the establishment of the county, the Choctaws lived in the central and southeastern parts.

"In its very earliest days, Clarke County did not share greatly in this population growth. It was so sparsely settled that in the first election held in the county it is believed that less than three hundred votes were cast...

"Clarke County was rural in character and its economy was based on agriculture, especially the cultivation of cotton. Flatboats and keelboats on the Chickasawhay River carried the products to market in the early days..."

In Febuary, 1864, General William T. Serman stormed into Meridian. Both Enterprise and Quitman sustained great damage and the railroad was destroyed. "The textile and the timber industries established in the decades after the Civil War provided prosperity up to the Depression."19

"Miss Gertrude and other family members were always willing to help their community. Reuben Taylor donated the land for the first school...Joe Taylor gave the land for a third school..."

"Another church in the Elwood community is Adams Chapel Methodist, established in 1893 on land donated by Mr. J.P. and Mrs. S. F. Adams."19

Children of John Adams and Epsey Young

Children of John Adams and Lydia Evans

Citations

  1. After my own long searching for the parents of John Adams, the mystery may be solved. In May 2008, George Shirley sent the following:

    "For years I have searched for the father of John Adams, Clarke County, Mississippi pioneer. Listed below is what I and a Florida researcher, a descendent of Thomas King III, have concluded.

    "In 1835, Thomas King III of Nassau County, FL crossed the state line into Camden County, GA with his sons John king, Hiram King, George King, son-in-law William Rouse and his brother Simeon Rouse proceeding to the Casey home. It is believed they were seeking revenge for his daughter Adeline king marrying William Casey against Thomas King's will and angry that the Caseys had supposedly untied his ferry boats at King's Ferry enabling them to float down the river towards the Atlantic Ocean. Several members of the Casey family were killed along with at least one other and several other people were wounded.

    "Thomas King III was caught, tried, and executed. All others escaped and fled. For years, various researchers have tried to find the King sons who fled. Recently...I have concluded that John and Hiram King fled to Jasper County, Mississippi and changed their last name to Adams..."
  2. [S246] George Shirley, "E-Mail Correspondence with George Shirley," E-Mail message from (author E-Mail address private) at Madison, Mississippi to this researcher, 22 Jul 2006 and following. Hereinafter cited as "Correspondence - George Shirley."
  3. [S33] 1860 United States Census, population schedule; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  4. [S34] 1870 United States Census, population schedule; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  5. [S37] 1850 United States Census, population schedule; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  6. [S48] "Adams Family Notes," (MS, about 1850; Lakewood, New Mexico); old papers, hand written, a printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher; Florence, Pinal County, Arizona. Hereinafter cited as "Adams Family Notes."
  7. [S295] Robert Scott Davis The Georgia Black Book: More Morbid, Macabre, & Sometimes Disgusting Records of Genealogical Value - just when you thought it was safe to get back into genealogy., II (Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1982), page 144.. Hereinafter cited as Georgia Black Book, Volume II.
  8. [S296] Fred R. and Hartz, Emilie K. Hartz Genealogical Abstracts from the Georgia Journal (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume Four, 1829-1835 (Vidalia, Georgia: Gwendolyn Press, 1990), p. 794-795.. Hereinafter cited as Georgia Journal Abstracts.
  9. [S373] Folks Huxford, compiler, Camden County, Georgia, Court House Records (Homerville, Georgia: Huxford Genealogical Society), p. 220.. Hereinafter cited as Camden County, Georgia, Court House Reords.
  10. [S384] Vertical Files of Camden County Georgia Records, Miscellaneous Unpublished Records, Bryan-Lang Historical Library, Woodbine, Camden County, Georgia, Leter to the Governor of Georgia by John H. McIntosh, on 25 Feb 18365. The original is on file in the Georgia Department of Archives and History.
  11. [S384] Vertical Files of Camden County Georgia Records, Miscellaneous Unpublished Records, Bryan-Lang Historical Library, Woodbine, Camden County, Georgia, Jacksonville courier, Jacksonville EastFlorida, Thursday, February 26, 1835.
  12. [S387] III, and his descendents Thomas King, Unpublished Manuscript, 23 April 1989, Compiled by Researcher Frank J. Peugh, Bryan-Lang Historical Library, Woodbine, Camden County, Georgia, p. 9.
  13. [S399] Judy Kroker, "Family Group Sheets for Thomas King III Sons and Daughters", April, 2009 (Longwood, Florida). These family group sheets are a compilation of the research of several King and Adams family researchers., Received by e-mail from Judy Krocker April 4, 2009.. Hereinafter cited as "King Family Group Sheets."
  14. [S383] John King (alias Adams), "Correspondence - John King (alia Adams)," (author E-Mail address private) at Savannah, Georgia, to Maria Teresea Woodlnd King, 25 Sep 1835, A copy of this letter was sent to this researcher by JudySteward Kroker, a King researcher.. Hereinafter cited as "Correspondence - John King."
  15. [S57] 1840 United States Census, population schedule; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com; from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  16. [S264] Jean Strickland & Patricia N. Edwards, compiler, Couny Mississippi Tax Rolls & Census 1835-1866 (P.O. Box 6147, Moss Point, Mississippi 39563: Self Published, 1990). Hereinafter cited as Mississippi Tax & Census.
  17. [S110] Jean & Edwards, Patricia N. Strickland, compiler, Records of Clarke Co., Mississippi. W.P.A. Source Materials, Deed Abstracts 1834-1854. (P.O. Box 5147, Moss Point, MS 39563: Jean Strickland & Patricia N. Edwards, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Records of Clarke Co., MS.
  18. [S243] Clarke County, Mississippi Deed Book C, C: page 223., Original Records, Clarke County, MS, Court Houe. Hereinafter cited as Clarke Co., MS, Deed Book C.
  19. [S237] Grady Pearl Dansby, editor, Historic Clarke County Mississippi (Quitman, Mississippi: Historic Clarke County, Inc, 1996), page 61-62 concerning the village of Elwood. Hereinafter cited as Historic Clarke County Mississippi.
  20. [S483] Roderick M. Terry, "Correspondence with Roderick M. Terry Regarding the Adams/King Family," (author E-Mail address private) at Pearl, Mississippi, to this researcher, March 2012, The quote regarding visits to Ms. McRae came from this source.. Hereinafter cited as "Correspondence - Roderick M. Terry."
  21. [S245] "Historical Research, Clarke County, Mississippi", 9 Nov 1936, Supervisor Sarah McCarty (Quitman, Mississippi), to unknown recipient (Clarke County, Mississippi), The canvassers for this report were Mrs. Eva Haney and Mrs. Anna B. Hardee. A copy of the report was sent to me by researcher George Shirley in Madison, Mississippi. This particular paper has been quoted in several Clarke County history books, particularly as it relates to the historic Adams home.; a printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher, Florence, Pinal County, Arizona. Hereinafter cited as "Clarke Co., MS, Research."
  22. [S264] Jean Strickland & Patricia N. Edwards, compiler, Couny Mississippi Tax Rolls & Census 1835-1866 (P.O. Box 6147, Moss Point, Mississippi 39563: Self Published, 1990), 1848 Tax Roll of Clarke Co., Mississippi, page 65.. Hereinafter cited as Mississippi Tax & Census.
  23. [S37] 1850 United States Census, population schedule, Clarke County, Mississippi, Pages 177-178, family 422.; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  24. [S242] Clarke County, Mississippi, Deed Book, F: page 153., Clarke County, Mississippi, Original Records. Hereinafter cited as Clarke County Deed Book.
  25. [S33] 1860 United States Census, population schedule, Quitman, Clarke County, Mississippi, p. 28 written, p. 614 stamped, family 183, farmer.; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  26. [S34] 1870 United States Census, population schedule, Enterprise, Clarke County, Mississippi, p. 734B, family 731, farmer.; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  27. [S244] Clarke County, Mississippi, Deed Book, Volume V: page 205, 11 Jul 1882., Original Records, Clarke County, MS, Court House. Hereinafter cited as Clarke Co, MS, Deed Book, V.
  28. [S432] Frank D. Buckley, "Young Genealogy (Genealogy of John Young, born 1776)", December 2008 (unknown compiler address). A numbe of other reseachers are credited in this genealogy: Sheryn Welburn, LDS Ancestral Files, Thomas J. Campbell, Freda Joyner and others, as well as various census and other records., Exact date in 1874 and place of death comes from this source.. Hereinafter cited as "Young Genealogy."