James King1

M, #3401, b. 2 May 1776, d. 1861
Last Edited=20 Nov 2009
     James King, son of John King and Jane Moorhead, was born on 2 May 1776.2,3 James King was the son of John King and Jane Moorhead.1

James King's father John sold him part of his Cherry Point Plantation and some other land. James and his family lived here until 1823.4

James King was included in the will of John King on 1 August 1803 at Camden County, Georgia; The will reads as follows:
"Be it Remembered that I John of the County of Camden State of Georgia planter have this day given and granted for and in consideration of the love and affection which I have unto my beloved son James King, a certain negro man named Tom, to have and to hold the said negro man Tom to him self his _____ and assigns, fully and of wright. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and seal this 20th day of August, One thousand Eight hundred and one."

And: "Know al whom it ay concern that I john King of the County of Camden planter have this day for the love and affection which I bear to my beloved son Thomas King given and granted unto him my said son Thomas King three certain negroes _____ Peter, Pheb, Nancy, to have and to hold the said negroes Peter, Pheb, & Nancy aforesaid as he cometh of age and until that time the said Negroes Peter, Pheb & Nancy is hereby declared to be under the directions of my beloved wife Jane King, to bring up and educate my son Thomas King in such manner as the produce of their labour will justify. In witness whereon I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 23rd day of June 1802. John King.5

James King married Margaret O'Neil, daughter of Henry O'Neil and Margaret Chambers, in 1808.1,6

In 1820, James King appeared on the United States Census, at St. Mary's, Camden County, Georgia, The census form is difficult to read. There are 5 sons under the age of 10, which corresponds to John Madison, William, James L.,George Decatur, and Archibald Edwin.7

James King was recorded as having brought slaves into the state of Georgia between 1818 and 1847. In those times most slaves were coming in from Florida, though some were from the Carolinas and Virginia.8

"James King lived on the Cherry Point property that had been his father's until he sold it...in 1823. About that time he moved inland to the west of the present Kingsland, where he established Woodlawn Plantation. The portion of this land lying between Catfish Creek and Crooked River had been granted to him by the State of Georgia and additional lands were acquired by purchase"

Julius King, son of Robert Newton King and grandson of James King reported:
"[James King] settled at Cherry Point in Camden County, and engaged in cattle raising and the growing of crops, principally of cotton and corn...The summer range on the coast was not so good for the cattle, as it was a few miles back in the interior, so grandpa established a camp, something like twelve miles west of Cherry Point, and about two and one-half miles from the St. Mary's River (three miles west of present-day Kingsland), where he found luxurious pasturage among the primeval pines, with an abundance of good fresh water in the ponds and streams. It was to this region about the camp that grandpa drove his thriving herds of cattle, and they would migrate back to the salt water region for their winter sojourn...My grandparents decided to quit Cherry Point as a place of residence, but they were not satisfied to settle at the camp to rear their growing family. Grandpa made at least two trips one into Laurens County, Georgia, and one into Florida, prospecting for a suitable place to make a permanent home, but each time he came back more discouraged, and a little more in love with the camp and its surroundings. Then it was that Grandma advised him to buy the camp and begin the establishment of Woodlawn. The time must have been very soon after the cessation of hostilities between England an our Country, which cessation was in the early part of 1815...Woodlawn afforded good water, good health, land capable of development for agriculture, fine pasturage and in the low lands and hammocks good hog range. In addition to these facts, the sparsely settled country abounded in game."9,10


In 1840, James King appeared on the United States Census, at St. Mary's River, Camden County, Georgia, Listed are: 1 male, age 5-10; 2 males, age 10-15; 1 male 15-20; 1 male 20-30; 1 male 60-70; 1 female 15-20; 1 female 20-30; 1 female 50-60.11

In 1850, James King appeared on the United States Census, at Camden County, Georgia.12

On 12 July 1860, James King appeared on the United States Census, at Camden County, Georgia, James is listed as a farmer whose real estate was worth $1,200 and whose personal estate was worth $17,311. He and his wife Margaret were living in close proximity to a number of other family members.13

James King died in 1861.9 and was buried at Zion Cemetery, Camden County, Georgia.9,14

In 1934, Julius King, grandson of James and Margaret (O'Neil) King, recorded some of his recollections from his boyhood when he visited with his grandparents. He mentions the names of some of their slaves: Salina, Charity, Cornelia, Selie, Sand, Lewis, Henry, John, and Dave. There was also "Daddy Tom" who was two years younger than his grandfather and who was given to him at birth.15

Children of James King and Margaret O'Neil

Citations

  1. [S382] Judy Stewart Kroker, "Correspondence with Judy Kroker Regarding the King/Adams Family," (author E-Mail address private) at Orlando, Florida, to this researcher, May 2008 and following. Hereinafter cited as "Correspondence - Judy Kroker."
  2. [S401] King/Wingate Family, The Holy Bible; Containing The Old and New Testaments (Mulberry Street, New York, New York: G. Lane & P. P. Sandford, 1841); Bryan-Lang Historical Library, New York. Hereinafter cited as Holy Bible - King Family.
  3. [S375] Eloise Bailey and Virginia Proctor, editor, Camden's Challenge: A History of Camden County, Georgia (Alpharetta, Georgia: WH Wolfe Associates, 1976), p. 420. Birth date is from this source.. Hereinafter cited as Camden's Challenge.
  4. [S386] Willam Hampton Adams, Reports of Investigations: Archaelogical Testing of Aboriginal and Historical Sites, Kings Bay, Georgia: The 1982-1983 Field Seasons, Series 4 (Gainsville, Florida: University of Florida), p. 25.. Hereinafter cited as Reports of Investigations - Cherry Point Plantation.
  5. [S85] Recorded Will, 1 Aug 1803, Camden County, Georgia, Will Book and Minutes Book F, pages 85 and 86. photocopy or digital copy is in the personal records of this researcher, Florence, Pinal County, Arizona.
  6. [S375] Eloise Bailey and Virginia Proctor, editor, Camden's Challenge: A History of Camden County, Georgia (Alpharetta, Georgia: WH Wolfe Associates, 1976), p. 420. Marriage year from this source.. Hereinafter cited as Camden's Challenge.
  7. [S140] 1820 United States Census, population schedule, St. Mary's, Camden County, Georgia.; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  8. [S384] Vertical Files of Camden County Georgia Records, Miscellaneous Unpublished Records, Bryan-Lang Historical Library, Woodbine, Camden County, Georgia, Affidavits Made By Owners Bringing Slaves into the State Between 1818 and 1847.
  9. [S375] Eloise Bailey and Virginia Proctor, editor, Camden's Challenge: A History of Camden County, Georgia (Alpharetta, Georgia: WH Wolfe Associates, 1976), p. 420.. Hereinafter cited as Camden's Challenge.
  10. [S386] Willam Hampton Adams, Reports of Investigations: Archaelogical Testing of Aboriginal and Historical Sites, Kings Bay, Georgia: The 1982-1983 Field Seasons, Series 4 (Gainsville, Florida: University of Florida), p. 26. Quote from grandson comes from this source.. Hereinafter cited as Reports of Investigations - Cherry Point Plantation.
  11. [S57] 1840 United States Census, population schedule, St. Mary's River, Camden County, Georgia.; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com; from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  12. [S37] 1850 United States Census, population schedule, Distict 9, page 14-15, Camden Couny, Georgia.; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  13. [S33] 1860 United States Census, population schedule, Clarkes District, Camden County, Georgia, page 7, family 237.; digital image by subscription, The Generations Network (http://www.ancestry.com); from the National Archives microfilm. A printed copy is in the personal records of this researcher.
  14. [S370] Larry Durbin, compiler, Camden County, Georgia, Cemeteries (Jacksonville, Florida: The Southern Genealogist's Exchange Society, Inc., 1993), p. 42.. Hereinafter cited as Camden County, Georgia, Cemeteries.
  15. [S384] Vertical Files of Camden County Georgia Records, Miscellaneous Unpublished Records, Bryan-Lang Historical Library, Woodbine, Camden County, Georgia.
  16. [S375] Eloise Bailey and Virginia Proctor, editor, Camden's Challenge: A History of Camden County, Georgia (Alpharetta, Georgia: WH Wolfe Associates, 1976), p. 421.. Hereinafter cited as Camden's Challenge.